Testing a 30 Day Blogging Challenge Before I assign to my Students

I’m planning my class for Marketing Foundations at Bryant University.  One of my thoughts was to assign the students a semester long challenge to creating a blog and building a sustainable amount of daily traffic.  In planning out what the actual objective would be and, therefore, what the assignments would be, I realized that I never built a high traffic blog.  Now, I have maintained this blog for a number of years but I really only did it as a side interest, almost a hobby.  Even though I’ve only posted here a couple of times in the last year, I still get a residual traffic of a few people a day.  When I was more of a regular poster, I did maintain traffic closer to a hundred people a day.  Nothing impressive but since it was never my objective to increase blog traffic, I was always ok with it.  I spoke to my wife about this potential assignment, who is vastly wiser than I am, and she suggested that I attempt to build a consistent traffic for this blog as a challenge before I assign it to anyone else.  The effort to do so would really teach the teacher as to whether this is a good homework assignment or not.

Now, I am cheating a little bit since I’m not starting with a new blog. I don’t believe that will make too much of a difference in the challenge. My goal will be to take the current traffic, which is less than 50 people a month to a 1000 unique visitors in August.

The assignment is to search for advice on how to build traffic on the web. Yes, I am planning on providing suggestions as well but anything I teach will be outdated by the time they graduate. I’m less interested in teaching students what is best practice today and more interested in teaching students to figure out current best practices. Google is your friend in that.

One of the first suggestions is to post frequently. Well that is pretty obvious. My assignment to the students is making a weekly post. Over a semester, that would be approximately 15 posts. Therefore, I’ll try to make 15 posts over August.

The second suggestion I found is to write posts that are 4000 to 8000 words long. The logic is that the more you write, the more likely you will leave a trail of key words that will help you rank higher in google search results. This is important since 90% of people click on the results from the first page only.

https://www.protofuse.com/blog/details/first-page-of-google-by-the-numbers/

I’m not a fan of 4000 word posts. I don’t believe I ever read one……I’ve started reading several of them but never finished one. I believe by focusing on what you want to say, you can include a significant number of key words that will help rank your blog higher in the search results. One of way of doing this is to realize that it will be very difficult getting on the first page with generic terms. For example, “blog” and “blog traffic” are probably written in hundreds of posts every day. “Growing blog traffic for school” is a search term that is much less likely to be used but it is also much less likely to show up in competitive blogs.

One way of finding these more specific terms is to google your more generic term and look for related searches recommended at the bottom of the page. For example, at the bottom of a search of “growing blog traffic” shows:

Related searches for growing blog traffic

A search for “blog traffic” has the following recommendations”

Related searches for blog traffic

To have a higher ranking blog, work these terms into the regular blog post. I’m going to close this post and will be back in a couple of days after researching a few more recommendations. There are a lot of other ways to grow traffic and I’ll report on as many as makes sense to me.

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